My Digital Story

Advertisements

Teaching identity

3 things I learned

1. Teaching is a passion! Obviously, but it made me think. You need the passion not just to teach the lecture you need the passion to be more! There is so many hats you put yourself into as a teacher! You need the passion to advocate for more for your students and to you students a better world.

2. Teaching is hard work. This is something I have been hearing a lot of, but the opposite. “Why did you become a teacher you are way smarter” I think this is a sterotype that we are handed out as if we are just there to watch the students and not teach them too!

3 Yerks discusses discourse and how she feels like a teacher when her shoes tap. For myself I feel like a teacher any time I advocate for something and anytime I exsplain my thoughts. I like using vivid examples to promote my learnings as interesting.

2 things I connected to

1. I know I have the passion because my roommate knows as much about the classes in university at I do. When I go home I practice what I learned by sharing my knowledge.

2. I connected with Yerks program! I have been saying this to so many people that the way she went to school will benefit her! I wish we could have that program here as well.

1 question I still have

teaching identity is important when are we going to be tested on our passion and skill is it only in our last year shouldn’t we get practice first?

My eyes are now open

My eyes are now open to our teaching family.

Who protect us and have set some crucial boundaries.

We are here to be proffesoional

and the knowledge that I gained

Is now stuck in my mind Replaying again

 

The Code of professional ethics taught me

we commit to not just learning but to community.

I learnt from the lecture our wage reality.

This class inspired my own masters degree.

The connections I have made have played in my mind

Yet the only connection I can make is the connection to time

Glad that I learned it now so at a time one day

I will be able to follow in a stronger kind of way.

a question that I leave with and wish to understand

Is how divide teaching from home life

and draw a line in the sand.

Mathematics in the Class

. At the beginning of the reading, Leroy Little Bear (2000) states that colonialism “tries to maintain a singular social order by means of force and law, suppressing the diversity of human worldviews. … Typically, this proposition creates oppression and discrimination” (p. 77). Think back on your experiences of the teaching and learning of mathematics — were there aspects of it that were oppressive and/or discriminating for you or other students?
2. After reading Poirier’s article: Teaching mathematics and the Inuit Community, identify at least three ways in which Inuit mathematics challenge Eurocentric ideas about the purposes mathematics and the way we learn it.

Thinking back, I remember how much I liked math but also remember if I didn’t show my work in the way we learnt how to complete it in class we would lose half the marks for the right answer. When the guest speaker talked about how you hold up your pointer and middle finger the student says two but you show them to other fingers and they question the answer. They both mean the same thing and asking that question to a student can really show how much they know about counting and give them the ability to question if two other fingers mean two. Students have the ability to achieve a lot if you give them the time. You do not need to instructionally teach them how to think about numbers because they can do the basics on their own.

“Counting: the systematic use of methods to compare and order sets of objects • Localization: the exploration of one’s spatial environment and the symbolization of that environment with the help of models, diagrams, drawings, words, or other means • Measuring: the use of objects or measuring tools to quantify dimensions • Design: the creation of forms for an object or for decorating an object • Games: the development of games and the more or less formal rules that the players must follow” These are four different ways that math is taught differently through other cultures. The first time I learned an indigenous method to do mathematics was in my second year of university.  We learned base 20 and other ways of writing numbers in different cultures. It is important as teachers we recognize math is not interpreted perfectly the same since other people have different methods towards learning it.

My Identity and my False Beliefs

Respond to the following:
A. How has your upbringing/schooling shaped how you you “read the world?” What biases and lenses do you bring to the classroom? How might we unlearn / work against these biases?
B. Which “single stories” were present in your own schooling? Whose truth mattered?

“I am a young white women, one, who was raised in a stereotypical white fenced lifestyle. I grew up in a small town, had blonde hair and blue eyes. I am a cisgender, heterosexual, middle class Canadian citizen. Some would call me normal, many would call me lucky, and I know I’m privileged.” (Hackl) This is a quote I used in another class to explain my upbringings that will influence my biases and assumptions I make in the classroom. I will never be able to understand going to school hungry and have that lived experience but I can do my best to help myself be aware of it. With me being aware of my own identity I can start to think about all the biases I will have going into a class and try my best to not be stereotypical and provide the most support I can. My single story is one many white Canadians would be able to identify with, its my turn to hear the real stories of people different than me.

A belief in my life that I continue to draw on is the idea that all Africans have aids, are poor, and are skinny with big tummies. I learnt this from TV commercials and thought that is what people in Africa looked like. I remember the first time I met someone who was chocolate colored I asked “So how did you get enough money to fly here and what did your hut look like.” It is crazy to think that my entire life I made a construct on a whole continent based on a commercial. For now on it is important for me too look into what I question and not be so naive to the world around me.

In order to unlearn the negative assumptions and biases we have formed, all we have to do it be patient. It will take a long time to get rid of these biases and assumptions fully. For now, it is important we can recognize them not only once their said or acted out, but, stop them when there already in our head. Many people will be bias without recognizing it. I noticed I was able to notice my biases more once I found my teaching Identity.

 

 

Teaching Treaty Ed

  1. What is the purpose of teaching Treaty Ed (specifically) or First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) Content and Perspectives (generally) where there are few or no First Nations, Metis, Inuit peoples? 2. What does it mean for your understanding of curriculum that “We are all treaty people”?

I am not really understanding the question, why should we teach Treaty Ed? The answer is simple, because we are on indigenous land. We made a treaty to support each other, it is a contract that was put in place to respect the people that were here first! We have been taught since we were kids “share your toys” and we were also taught “do not steal” but the history of the land we are on taught the opposite of these morals. When the European settlers arrived they had every intention to use the indigenous and because they felt they were more civilized it was easy to trick them. European settlers on no occasion had in mind that they would share instead they had in mind that they could takeover the indigenous culture and use the people for their own benefit. We forced the Indigenous people to become someone they were not, converting them knowing it would erase their culture. This was done through Residential Schools. This is extremely sad. We need to teach Treaty Ed because if you are a Canadian citizen you are a treaty person one who is supposed to abide and understand the laws that were made many years ago. We had a contract to be together not to be one culture. It is important to teach Treaty Ed because it’s our history, and if we don’t teach it the domino effect of tragedy will continue to pass through the indigenous families over and over again. Education through schools about Treaty Ed is important because parents can drive opposite points of views at home. When the students learn they will be able to argue facts in order to teach their parents the proof. We need to remember that it is crucial to address the assimilation that was done and the culture that was lost. We need to look at our broken promises and promise to never break them again.